Invade a Middle Eastern Country in Five Easy Steps

Now that we have withdrawn our troops from Iraq and are positioning our military assets to invade Syria, it is important to take notice of how the United States puts plans in action to take over a country of interest. The plan to invade Iraq took over 20 years to fall into place. Please note that there are active plans and contingency plans and backup plans to invade countries such as Venezuela, North Korea, Iran, and of course Syria as we speak. Prior to the 1980’s the preferred method of US intervention in a covering nation was with a US backed military coup such as was the case in 1973 Chilean and 1953 Iranian coup, in both with overthrew democratically elected governments.

Five Easy Steps to Invade a Nation

Aiding and Abetting – Open trade relations and trade military hardware with said nation. In the case of Iraq, the United States supplied Saddam Hussein’s army with military support during Iran-Iraq War. At the end of the Iran-Iraq War, Saddam Hussein had more tanks, aircraft fighters, attack helicopters, and artillery than he started with.

Crimes Against Humanity – After you support a dilator or political regime for some time with most favored nation status or military hardware, at some point you egg them on to commit crimes against humanity or you just cow the press to report such propaganda. The cable news networks are always happy to read any press release without doing actual journalism as was the case in the Nayirah testimony. In 1992, as Iraq invaded Kuwait, an anonymous eyewitness testified that she had seen Iraqi soldiers take babies out of incubators in Kuwaiti hospitals and leave the babies to die. I was later revealed that the anonymous eyewitness was actually part of a public relations campaign run in behalf of the Kuwaiti government. More recently, similarly dubious and preposterous propaganda surfaced the whole Libyan army was ordered to take Viagra and “rape and pillage” the country.

Economic Trade Embargo – Even with our superior military the United States would never go toe to toe with a comparable enemy. We do great going against a starved 90 pound belligerent camel jockey with nothing more than a pair of sandals and an rusted AK-47 in the middle of a desert than trained conscripts. A trade embargo to take affect can take up to a decade as it did in Iraq.

Days Not Weeks – After ten years of trade embargo the economy and in turn the military is in complete disarray, and as President Obama said of the Libyan regime, “it is a matter of days not weeks” to overthrow the government and occupy the capital. In the Iraq War of 2003, the United State forces reached Baghdad in 3 weeks.

Billion Dollar Contracts – The final step is to collect the cash in the form of billion dollar contracts to rebuild the country that was recently bomb and ruined by economic embargoes. There will be schools to build, oil wells to dig, and other resources to extract. The financing of the reconstruction is the best part, because in all likelihood the invaded country is so broke that they don’t have the billions to award to contract winners, so we lend them the money and force the invaded country to award the contracts to our own pals and the invaded country is on the hook for the cash with interest. Classic economic hitman financing.

How Will the Last Gallon of Oil Be Used?

In his book Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed Jared Diamond wrote about the collapse of Easter Island amongst other failed civilizations. Easter Island is one of the most remote places in the world. Located in the South Pacific, it’s nearest habitable neighbor is over 1000 miles away. It’s over 2000 miles west of Chile. The island is thought to have been first inhabited by Polynesians between 700-1100 AD. Here is a description based on European eyewitnesses.

Easter Island has been cited as an example of a human population crash. When fewer than 100 humans first arrived, the island was covered with trees with a large variety of food types. In 1722, the island was visited by Jacob Roggeveen, who estimated a population of 2000 to 3000 inhabitants with very few trees, “a rich soil, good climate” and “all the county was under cultivation”. Half a century later, it was described as “a poor land” and “largely uncultivated”.
Source: Wikipedia

From archaeological evidence, early in its history Easter Island was a lush and fruitful Island. The island supported a unique culture until the population exhausted all of the available resources. In his book, Jared Diamond posed a question that stuck with me, he asked, what were the thoughts of the person that cut down that last tree on Easter Island as they were cutting it down? What was the branches, limbs, and wood of the last tree of Easter Island used for? Were the remains of that last tree used for shelter, for weapons, or for fire wood?

By some estimates, we have consumed about half of the world’s oil reserves in a little over a century and oil demand is only increasing. Whether or not these estimates are correct, one can imagine a time in the future when all the reaming oil will be down to one barrel. What will that last barrel of oil be used for?